The Loss of the Cataraque 1845

NARRATIVE of Mr. Guthrie, Chief Officer of the “Cataraque.”

The “Cataraque,” Captain C. W. Finlay, sailed from Liverpool on the 20th April 1845, with 369 emigrants, and a crew, including two doctors, Mr. C. Carpenter and Edward Carpenter (two brothers), of forty-six souls. The emigrants were principally from Bedfordshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire; about 120 of the passengers were married, with families, and in all seventy-three children.

Nothing particular occurred until a fortnight prior to the 4th August, with the exception of the weather being boisterous, with a strong ale of wind from the north-west to the south-west, and incessant rain. On the night of §. the 3d August, at seven in the evening, the ship was hove to, and continued lying to until three o’clock on the morning of the 4th. At half past four, it being quite dark, and raining hard, blowing a fearful gale, and the sea running mountains high, the ship struck on a reef situate on the west coast of King’s Island, at the entrance of Bass’s Straits. No opportunity had offered for taking an observation to enable the captain to ascertain the ship’s course for four days prior to the ship striking; and, from the dead reckoning kept, it was presumed that the vessel was in 141° 22′ east longitude, and 39° 17′ south, which would make her between 60 or 70 miles from King’s Island.

Immediately the ship struck, she was sounded, and four feet water was in her hold. The scene of confusion and misery that ensued at this awful period it is impossible to describe; all the passengers attempted to rush on deck, and many succeeded in doing so, until the ladders were knocked away by the workings of the vessels; when the shrieks from men, women and children from below was terrific, calling on the watch on deck to assist them. The crew, to a man, were on deck the moment the ship struck, and were instantly employed in handing up the passengers. Up to the time the vessel began breaking up, it is supposed that between three and four hundred were got on deck, by the extraordinary exertions of the crew.

At this time the sea was breaking over the ship on the larboard side, sweeping the decks, every sea taking away more or less of the passengers. About five A.M. the ship careened right over on her larboard side, washing away boats, bulwarks, spars, a part of the cuddy, and literally swept the decks. At this critical period the captain gave orders to cut away the masts, hoping the vessel might right, to enable the crew to get on deck the o left below. The masts were forthwith cut away, and every thing done that could under the circumstances to get the vessel upright, but it was all to no purpose.

At this time the passengers below were all drowned, the ship being full of water, and the captain called out to those on deck to cling to that part of the wreck which was then above water till daylight, hoping that the spars would be of some service in making a breakwater under her lee, and thus enable the survivors to get on shore in the morning. As the day broke we found the stern of the vessel washed in, and numerous dead bodies floating around the ship, some hanging upon the rocks. Several of the passengers and crew (about 200 altogether) were still holding on to the vessel, the sea breaking over, and every wave washing some of them away. Thus those who were able, continued to cling to the wreck until about four in the afternoon, when she parted amidships at the fore part of the main rigging, when immediately some 70 or a 100 were launched into the tumultuous and remorseless waves.

The survivors on the deck still, however, continued to exert themselves to recover back all they could ; but many of them were dead, although but momentarily immersed. Ridge lines also were stretched along the side of the wreck, to enable them to hold on. The remains of the upper deck now began to break up and wash away. The survivors now began to collect bits of rope, so as to construct a buoy, with the view of floating it on shore, and thus enabling one of the crew to land. This measure would have enabled them to save the lives of at least 100; but notwithstanding every effort, the buoy could not be got nearer than 20 yards from the shore, owing to its getting entangled with the sea-weed on the rocks, and there was no one on shore to catch it, and secure it on the sand.

The fury of the waves continuing unabated, about five o’clock the wreck parted by the forerigging, and so many souls were submerged in the wide waters, that only 70 survivors were left crowded on the forecastle. The buoy rope was then hauled on board to rig life-lines and lash the survivors who were then clinging to the wreck; thus the sea breaking over them, the winds raging and the rain continuing heavy all night, the poor survivors continued clinging to the vessel’s bow. Numbers died and fell overboard, or sank, and were drowned at the places where they were lashed. As day broke the following morning it discovered only about thirty left alive, the survivors mostly dead through exhaustion, and hanging where they were lashed. The previous evening the quarter boat (the only remaining one) was attempted to be launched, into which the boatswain and doctor (Charles Carpenter), with four of the crew, got, but she immediately capsized, and all were drowned.

As the morning rose, the sea was making a clean breach into the forecastle, the deck of which was rapidly breaking up. About this time, whilst numbers were helplessly clinging to the bows, and continually dropping off without the possibility of succour, the captain attempted to reach the shore, but was unable, and, with the assistance of some of those who were able, regained the wreck. The lashings of the survivors were now undone, in order to give them the last chance of life. Mr. Thomas Guthrie, the chief mate, now on the spritsailyard, was washed out to the bowsprit; he saw the captain and second mate and steward clinging at the bows, with about 18 or 20 only left alive, amid a host of dead bodies on the fragment of the wreck. Mr. Guthrie was driven to a detached part of the wreck, but soon found it was impossible to live with such a sea breaking over, seized a piece of plank under his arm, and leaping into the water, was carried over the reef, and thus got on shore.

He found a passenger who had got ashore during the night, and one of the crew, (Robinson) who got ashore in the morning. John Roberts, a seaman, plunged in when he saw the mate ashore, and, partly swimming and partly driven, reached the land. Five other seamen followed, and got ashore dreadfully exhausted. Almost immediately afterwards the vessel disappeared. Thus out of 423 souls on board, only nine were saved. The names of the saved are, Mr. Thomas Guthrie, chief mate; Solomon Brown, emigrant; John Roberts, able seaman; William Jones, ditto; Francis Millan, ditto; John Simpson, ditto; John Robertson, ditto; Peter Johnson, ditto; and William Blackstock, apprentice.

They had neither food nor drink from the time of the ship striking to the Tuesday afternoon, when they found one small tin of preserved fowl, after eating which, they went and laid down in the bush, having got a wet blanket out of the water for their only covering, and being quite destitute of clothes. The beach was strewed with pieces of the wreck and portions of dead corpses in horrible profusion. After a vain search for water, and being unable to find any more survivors, they slept that night in the bush. The following morning they found a cask of water ashore, but were unable to get means to make a fire. However, about 9 or 10 o’clock in the forenoon, they observed a smoke, which presuming they were on the main land (according to the captain’s calculations) imagined it was a fire of the natives. However, they shortly saw a white man approaching them, who turned out to be Mr. David Howie, residing upon the island.

It seems Mr. Howie and Oakley, with one black, perceived there was a wreck on the coast through seeing portions of wreck, and most humanely arranged to instantly reconnoitre the whole island, and fortunate, indeed, was it for the poor exhausted and henumbed survivors, to whom he instantly afforded fire, and food, and constructed a shed against the weather. As Mr. Howie’s boat was wrecked, there was no possibility of leaving the island. The party therefore constructed a hut, and remained five weeks, during which time they were most hospitably E. for by Mr. Howie and his party, of to their means, the supplies having to e carried forty miles over a most difficult road. Last Sunday (September 7th) they saw the “Midge” beating for the island; they immediately signalled her by a fire, and from her received every assistance. The “Midge” took them off the island with much difficulty, by means of Mr. Howie’s whale boat, on Tuesday last, and they arrived in Hobson’s Bay at half-past ten this day.

Throughout the whole of these trying events, the survivors give all praise to the captain and crew for their exertions; it was not until hope was utterly extinguished that they left the vessel. Mr. Guthrie, the mate, is also warmly commended. It was to his encouragement that most of the seamen saved, ascribe the saving of their lives in the manner above mentioned. They employed themselves in burying the dead bodies they picked up as far as was possible, the mangled condition of many of which it is too painfully horrible to describe; and they speak in the most gratified manner of the exertions of Mr. Howie and his party of sealers, who reside upon King’s Island. Th e The survivors also particularly wish to express their public thanks to Messrs. Fletcher & Cockburn, owners of the “Midge,” for their promptness in attending to the signal upon the island, aud themselves incurring risk in waiting to fetch them off. Most of the ship’s papers and the mail (except 35 letters) are lost.

Captain Finlay, who was a native of Dublin, has left a wife and two children in Liverpool to lament their loss.

*     *    *    *    *

ALPHABETICAL List of Bounty Emigrants which embarked on board the Ship “Cataraque,” of 802 tons burden, at Liverpool, on the 20th April, bound for Port Phillip, but which was totally wrecked on the west coast of King’s Island, in Bass’s Straits, on the morning of the 4th August 1845, by which dreadful catastrophe the whole of the Passengers, amounting to the Number of 370, were lost, with the single exception of a married male Emigrant, named Solomon Brown.

Of the crew, consisting of 41 persons, the first mate, Mr. Guthery, six seamen, and one apprentice only, were saved. By this almost unparalleled calamity, out of 411 souls, including passengers and crew, only nine persons were saved. The accompanying List was compiled from two bundles of certificates of character of the emigrants, which were washed on shore from the wreck, picked up by the survivors, and brought to Melbourne by the first mate on the 13th of September.

Alphabetical List of EMIGRANTs on board the Ship “Cataraque,” at Liverpool.

(Recording Name, Age, Calling (Occupation), and Native Parish)

FAMILIES LIST

1 – Andrews – William – 24 – Labourer – Chesterton
2 – Andrews – Maria – 26 – Wife – Chesterton

3 – Allens – Thomas – 31 – Carpenter – Brisbrook
4 – Allens – Anne – 29 – Wife – Brisbrook
5 – Allens – Elizabeth – 7 – Daughter – Brisbrook
6 – Allens – Susan – 5 – Daughter – Brisbrook
7 – Allens – Alice – 3 – Daughter – Brisbrook
8 – Allens – Jane – 5 weeks – Daughter – Brisbrook

9 – Allen – William – 37 – Carpenter – Brisbrook
10 – Allen – Anne – 40 – Wife – Brisbrook
11 – Allen – Mary – 14 – Daughter – Brisbrook
12 – Allen – Joseph – 11 – Son – Brisbrook

13 – Banks – James – 31 – Labourer – Kenmare
14 – Banks – Petra – 31 – Wife – Kenmare

15 – Barrett – William – 38 – Labourer – Stonesfield
16 – Barrett – Mary – 39 – Wife – Stonesfield
17 – Barrett – George – 10 – Son – Stonesfield
18 – Barrett – Dinah – 9 – Daughter – Stonesfield
19 – Barrett – Henry – 7 – Son – Stonesfield
20 – Barrett – Francis – 6 – Son – Stonesfield

21 – Baxter – James – 24 – Labourer – Woodborough
22 – Baxter – Sarah – 23 – Wife – Woodborough

23 – Bennett – Samuel – 22 – Labourer – Hollington and Scarland Scroope
24 – Bennett – Elizabeth – 23 – Wife – Hollington and Scarland Scroope

25 – Bennett – Page – 20 – Labourer – Roxton, near Digby
26 – Bennett – Charlotte – 20 – Wife – Roxton, near Digby

27 – Bishop – William – 38 – Labourer – Hooton
28 – Bishop – Hannah – 26 – Wife – Hooton
29 – Bishop – Sarah – 16 – Daughter – Hooton
30 – Bishop – Elizabeth – 13 – Daughter – Hooton

31 – Black – Patrick – 40 – Labourer – Emetrim
32 – Black – Catherine – 37 – Wife – Emetrim
33 – Black – Ellen – 14 – Daughter – Emetrim
34 – Black – Patt – 12 – Son – Emetrim
35 – Black – Mary – 9 – Daughter – Emetrim
36 – Black – James – 3 – Son – Emetrim

37 – Brady – John – 36 – Labourer – Cam.
38 – Brady – Mary – 38 – Wife – Cam.

39 – Brown – Solomon – 30 – Labourer – Sutton, Bedfordshire – The only survivor of all the emigrants
40 – Brown – Hanna – 40 – Wife – Sutton
41 – Brown – Ellen – 14 – Daughter – Sutton
42 – Brown – Phoebe – 8 – Daughter – Sutton
43 – Brown – Elizabeth – 5 – Daughter – Sutton
44 – Brown – Ruth – 9 months – Daughter – Sutton

45 – Buck – Edward – 31 – Labourer – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
46 – Buck – Elizabeth – 30 – Wife – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
47 – Rowbottom – John – 10 – Stepson (supposed) – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
48 – Rowbottom – William – 4 – Stepson (supposed) – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
49 – Rowbottom – James – 2 – Stepson (supposed) – Ashby-de-la-Zouch

50 – Bushby – Beecher – 45 – Labourer – Collinworth
51 – Bushby – Elizabeth – 43 – Wife – Collinworth
52 – Bushby – Emma – 20 – Daughter – Collinworth
53 – Bushby – William – 17 – Son – Collinworth
54 – Bushby – John – 14 – Son – Collinworth
55 – Bushby – Hanna – 12 – Daughter – Collinworth
56 – Bushby – George – 6 – Son – Collinworth
57 – Bushby – Sarah – 8 months – Daughter – Collinworth

58 – Carter – Benjamin – 24 – Labourer – Bolnhurst
59 – Carter – Sarah – 26 – Wife – Bolnhurst
60 – Carter – George – 9 – Son – Bolnhurst
61 – Carter – Eli – 7 – Son – Bolnhurst
62 – Carter – Susan – 4 – Daughter – Bolnhurst
63 – Carter – Stephen – 9 months – Son – Bolnhurst

64 – Chuck – Robert – 24 – Labourer – Bassingbourne – Brother of Susannah Chuck recorded under Unmarried Females
65 – Chuck – Mary – 22 – Wife – Bassingbourne
66 – Chuck – Sarah – 5 months – Daughter – Bassingbourne

67 – Clark – Jonathan – 29 – Labourer – Eyworth
68 – Clark – A. Julia – 19 – Wife – Eyworth
69 – Clark – Matilda – 10 months – Daughter – Eyworth

70 – Cook – James – 27 – Labourer – Tackley
71 – Cook – Anne – 23 – Wife – Tackley
72 – Cook – Mary – 5 – Daughter – Tackley
73 – Cook – Jane – 2 – Daughter – Tackley
74 – Cook – John – 10 months – Son – Tackley

75 – Cook – William – 39 – Labourer – Tackley
76 – Cook – Anne – 36 – Wife – Tackley
77 – Cook – M. Anne – 15 – Daughter – Tackley
78 – Cook – Sarah – 11 – Daughter – Tackley
79 – Cook – Francis – 6 – Son – Tackley
80 – Cook – Richard – 5 – Son – Tackley
81 – Cook – John – 3 – Son – Tackley
82 – Cook – William – 5 months – Son – Tackley

83 – Cotterill – Joseph – 22 – Labourer – Frinkford
84 – Cotterill – Martha – 20 – Wife – Frinkford
85 – Cotterill – George – 2 – Son – Frinkford
86 – Cotterill – Eliza – 2 months – Daughter – Frinkford

87 – Copeland – John – 31 – Labourer – Newlake
88 – Copeland – Rebecca – 31 – Wife – Newlake
89 – Copeland – Samuel – 12 – Son – Newlake
90 – Copeland – Joseph – 10 – Son – Newlake
91 – Copeland – John – 8 – Son – Newlake
92 – Copeland – Mary – 4 – Daughter – Newlake
93 – Copeland – William – 10 months – Son – Newlake

94 – Daisley – Gilbert – 28 – Shepherd – Sutton
95 – Daisley – Anne – 29 – Wife – Sutton
96 – Daisley – Eliza – 9 – Daughter – Sutton
97 – Daisley – William – 10 months – Son – Sutton

98 – Daisley – George – 26 – Labourer – Sutton
99 – Daisley – Ruth – 30 – Wife – Sutton

100 – Dawson – Thomas – 23 – Labourer – Clanbourney
101 – Dawson – Jane – 22 – Wife – Clanbourney

102 – Friday – George – 25 – Shepherd – Eyworth
103 – Friday – Anne – 24 – Wife – Eyworth
104 – Friday – George – 1 – Son – Eyworth

105 – Floyd – Stephen – 26 – Labourer – Packley
106 – Floyd – Hanna – 25 – Wife – Packley
107 – Floyd – M. Anne – 2 – Daughter – Packley
108 – Floyd – William – 3 months – Son – Packley

109 – Follis – George – 30 – Carpenter – Emetrim
110 – Follis – Mary – 23 – Wife – Emetrim
111 – Follis – Anne – 4 – Daughter – Emetrim
112 – Follis – William – 1 – Son – Emetrim

113 – Franklin – Samuel – 30 – Labourer – Eyworth
114 – Franklin – M. Anne – 28 – Wife – Eyworth
115 – Franklin – Thomas – 5 – Son – Eyworth
116 – Franklin – Rhoda – 2 – Daughter – Eyworth

117 – Gardiner – Edward – 39 – Labourer – Great Bramford
118 – Gardiner – Anne – 37 – Wife – Great Bramford
119 – Gardiner – Charlotte – 15 – Daughter – Great Bramford
120 – Gardiner – Henry – 12 – Son – Great Bramford
121 – Gardiner – Sarah – 9 – Daughter – Great Bramford
122 – Gardiner – Joseph – 8 – Son – Great Bramford
123 – Gardiner – M. Anne – 6 – Daughter – Great Bramford
124 – Gardiner – Priscilla – 4 – Daughter – Great Bramford
125 – Gardiner – William – 1 ½ – Son – Great Bramford

126 – Hay – William – 24 – Labourer – Ballyhay
127 – Hay – A. Jane – 23 – Wife – Ballyhay

128 – Halbert – Joseph – 27 – Labourer – Collinworth
129 – Halbert – Anne – 26 – Wife – Collinworth
130 – Halbert – M. Anne – 4 – Daughter – Collinworth
131 – Halbert – Elizabeth – 4 – Daughter – Collinworth
132 – Halbert – William – infant – Son – Collinworth

133 – Hoare – Robert – 26 – Labourer – Tackley
134 – Hoare – Emma – 23 – Wife – Tackley
135 – Hoare – Thomas – 2 – Son – Tackley
136 – Hoare – Millicient – 9 months – Daughter (recorded as son) – Tackley

137 – Hodgins – Joseph – 40 – Labourer – Tackley
138 – Hodgins – Mary – 35 – Labourer – Ardbraccan
139 – Hodgins – Rose – 18 – Daughter – Ardbraccan
140 – Hodgins – William – 13 – Son – Ardbraccan
141 – Hodgins – Joseph – 12 – Son – Ardbraccan
142 – Hodgins – Mary – 7 – Daughter – Ardbraccan
143 – Hodgins – James – 6 – Son – Ardbraccan

144 – Hugall – James – 32 – Labourer – Mansfield and vicinity
145 – Hugall – Elizabeth – 30 – Wife – Mansfield and vicinity

146 – Izard (Izzard) – William – 33 – Labourer – Gilden Marden
147 – Izard (Izzard) – Sarah – 32 – Wife – Gilden Marden – nee Webb – Sister of Fanny Pearce
148 – Izard (Izzard) – Anne – 10 – Daughter – Gilden Marden
149 – Izard (Izzard) – John – 5 – Son – Gilden Marden
150 – Izard (Izzard) – David – 3 – Son – Gilden Marden
151 – Izard (Izzard) – Henry – 9 months – Son – Gilden Marden

152 – Knott – Charles – 39 – Labourer – Great Huskey
153 – Knott – Rebecca – 40 – Wife – Great Huskey
154 – Knott – Matthew – 17 – Son – Great Huskey
155 – Knott – Joseph – 14 – Son – Great Huskey
156 – Knott – John – 12 – Son – Great Huskey
157 – Knott – Charles – 10 – Son – Great Huskey
158 – Knott – Anne – 8 – Daughter – Great Huskey
159 – Knott – Rebecca – 3 – Daughter – Great Huskey
160 – Knott – James – 2 – Son – Great Huskey

161 – Maguire – Patrick – 44 – Labourer – Killenhem
162 – Maguire – Catherine – 40 – Wife – Killenhem
163 – Maguire – Michael – 17 – Son – Killenhem
164 – Maguire – Bridget – 14 – Daughter – Killenhem
165 – Maguire – Jane – 12 – Daughter – Killenhem
166 – Maguire – Patrick – 10 – Son – Killenhem
167 – Maguire – Catherine – 8 – Daughter – Killenhem
168 – Maguire – Philip – 6 – Son – Killenhem
169 – Maguire – John – 3 – Son – Killenhem

170 – Murray (Merry) – Anthony – 37 – Labourer – Tackley
171 – Murray (Merry) – Edith – 36 – Wife – Tackley
172 – Murray (Merry) – Martha – 16 – Daughter – Tackley
173 – Murray (Merry) – Joseph – 14 – Son – Tackley
174 – Murray (Merry) – John – 13 – Son – Tackley
175 – Murray (Merry) – William – 10 – Son – Tackley
176 – Murray (Merry) – James – 9 – Son – Tackley
177 – Murray (Merry) – Emma – 7 – Daughter – Tackley
178 – Murray (Merry) – Rhoda – 5 – Daughter – Tackley
179 – Murray (Merry) – Mathew – 3 – Son – Tackley
180 – Murray (Merry) – Susan – 11 months – Daughter – Tackley

181 – M’Caffrey – Bernard – 37 – Labourer – Anna, West
182 – M’Caffrey – Mary – 29 – Wife – Anna, West
183 – M’Caffrey – Patt – 13 – Son – Anna, West
184 – M’Caffrey – James – 11 – Son – Anna, West
185 – M’Caffrey – Edward – 9 – Son – Anna, West
186 – M’Caffrey – Bernard – 7 – Son – Anna, West
187 – M’Caffrey – Catherine – 5 – Daughter – Anna, West
188 – M’Caffrey – Rhody – 3 – Daughter – Anna, West
189 – M’Caffrey – Susan – 20 – Sister (supposed) – Anna, West

190 – Newall – Jacob – 26 – Labourer – Bolnhurst
191 – Newall – Elizabeth – 26 – Wife – Bolnhurst
192 – Newall – Lucy – 3 ½ – Daughter – Bolnhurst

193 – Paterson – John – 39 – Labourer – Curran
194 – Paterson – Anna – 37 – Wife – Curran
195 – Paterson – Mary – 13 – Daughter – Curran
196 – Paterson – Catherine – 11 – Daughter – Curran
197 – Paterson – Ellen – 9 – Daughter – Curran
198 – Paterson – Biddy – 7 – Daughter – Curran
199 – Paterson – William – 3 – Son – Curran

200 – Pierce (Pearce) – Emos – 35 – Labourer – Gilden Marden – Cousin of Thomas Pettengell
201 – Pierce (Pearce) – Fanny – 35 – Wife – Gilden Marden – nee Webb – Sister of Sarah Izzard
202 – Pierce (Pearce) – Anne – 15 – Daughter – Gilden Marden
203 – Pierce (Pearce) – Joseph – 11 – Son – Gilden Marden
204 – Pierce (Pearce) – Mary – 10 – Daughter – Gilden Marden
205 – Pierce (Pearce) – Sarah – 6 – Daughter – Gilden Marden
206 – Pierce (Pearce) – Eda – 4 – Daughter – Gilden Marden
207 – Pierce (Pearce) – Emos – 3 – Son – Gilden Marden
208 – Pierce (Pearce) – David – 1 – Son – Gilden Marden

209 – Pettingett (Pettengell) – Thomas – 34 – Labourer – Gilden Marden – Cousin of Amos Pearce
210 – Pettingett (Pettengell) – Elizabeth – 31 – Wife – Gilden Marden – nee Butler – Aunt of Thomas Smith (Families List) and Jonas Smith (Unmarried Males List)
211 – Pettingett (Pettengell) – William – 11 – Son – Gilden Marden

212 – Rowbottom – William – 24 – Bricklayer – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
213 – Rowbottom – Not Recorded (illegible on original) – 28 – Wife – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
214 – Rowbottom – Fanny – 4 – Daughter – Ashby-de-la-Zouch
215 – Rowbottom – Anne – 2 – Daughter – Ashby-de-la-Zouch

216 – Rutter – William – 25 – Labourer – Fritwell
217 – Rutter – Fanny – 25 – Wife – Fritwell
218 – Rutter – Matilda – 2 ½ – Daughter – Fritwell
219 – Rutter – Mary – 1 ½ – Daughter – Fritwell

220 – Ryman – John – 29 – Labourer – Tackley
221 – Ryman – Hanna – 26 – Wife – Tackley
222 – Ryman – James – 8 – Step – son, supposed – Tackley
223 – Ryman – Joseph – 5 – Son – Tackley
224 – Ryman – M. Jane – 1 – Daughter – Tackley

225 – Rolling – James – 45 – Labourer – Stonesfield
226 – Rolling – Hanna – 39 – Wife – Stonesfield
227 – Rolling – Caroline – 18 – Daughter – Stonesfield
228 – Rolling – Sarah – 16 – Daughter – Stonesfield
229 – Rolling – Emily – 13 – Daughter – Stonesfield
230 – Rolling – Henry – 9 – Son – Stonesfield
231 – Rolling – William – 6 – Son – Stonesfield
232 – Rolling – Francis – 2 – Son – Stonesfield

233 – Stafford – Ephraim – 31 – Labourer – Colamworth
234 – Stafford – Sarah – 30 – Wife – Colamworth
235 – Stafford – George – 8 – Son – Colamworth
236 – Stafford – Eliza – 7 – Daughter – Colamworth
237 – Stafford – Catherine – 4 – Daughter – Colamworth
238 – Stafford – Charles – 2 – Son – Colamworth

239 – Savings – John – 33 – Labourer – Tackley
240 – Savings – Sarah – 35 – Wife – Tackley
241 – Payne – Elizabeth – 5 – Step – daughter – Tackley
242 – Payne – Frederick – 4 – Step – son – Tackley
243 – Savings – Philip – 9 months – Son – Tackley
250 – Savings – Paul – 11 – Step – son, supposed – Tackley
251 – Savings – H. William – 10 – Step – son, supposed – Tackley
253 – Savings – Patience – 11 – Step – daughter – Tackley
254 – Savings – John – 3 – Step – son – Tackley

244 – Shirley – James – 29 – Blacksmith – Chisham
245 – Shirley – Martha – 26 – Wife – Chisham
246 – Shirley – Martha – 2 – Daughter – Chisham
259 – Shirley – William – 7 months – Son – Chisham

247 – Simmonds – William – 33 – Shepherd – Biddington
248 – Simmonds – Deborah – 32 – Wife – Biddington
249 – Simmonds – M. Anne – 12 – Daughter – Biddington
252 – Simmonds – Emma – 7 – Daughter – Biddington
255 – Simmonds – John – 7 months – Son – Biddington

256 – Smith – Thomas – 23 – Labourer – Gilden Marden – Nephew of Elizabeth Pettingell (nee Butler) – Brother of Jonas Smith recorded in Unmarried Males List
257 – Smith – Susanna – 27 – Wife – Gilden Marden
258 – Smith – Eliza – 6 – Daughter – Gilden Marden

260 – Tagart – Hugh – 38 – Labourer – Chisham
261 – Tagart – Mary – 37 – Wife – Killway
262 – Tagart – Mary – 15 – Daughter – Killway
263 – Tagart – John – 11 – Son – Killway
264 – Tagart – Bridget – 9 – Daughter – Killway
265 – Tagart – Catherine – 7 – Daughter – Killway
266 – Tagart – Elizabeth – 5 – Daughter – Killway
267 – Tagart – Sarah – 2 – Daughter – Killway
268 – Tagart – Jessy – 4 months – Daughter – Killway

269 – Todkill – William – 34 – Labourer – Pointon
270 – Todkill – Sarah – 20 – Wife – Pointon
271 – Todkill – Robert – 12 – Son – Pointon
272 – Todkill – John – 10 – Son – Pointon
273 – Todkill – William – 5 – Son – Pointon
274 – Todkill – Martha – 4 – Daughter – Pointon

275 – Woods – William – 23 – Carpenter – Ballyrooney
276 – Woods – Anne – 21 – Wife – Ballyrooney

277 – Woods – Robert – 28 – Carpenter – Ballyrooney
278 – Woods – Agnes – 34 – Wife – Ballyrooney
279 – Woods – Eleanor – 16 – Daughter – Ballyrooney
280 – Woods – Robert – 12 – Son – Ballyrooney
281 – Woods – William – 9 – Son – Ballyrooney
282 – Woods – Agnes – 6 – Daughter – Ballyrooney
283 – Woods – Rachael – 5 – Daughter – Ballyrooney
284 – Woods – Matilda – 2 – Daughter – Ballyrooney
285 – Woods – Margaret – 8 months – Daughter – Ballyrooney

286 – Woods – John – 36 – Labourer – Anna
287 – Woods – Jane – 34 – Wife – Anna
288 – Woods – Henry – 14 – Son – Anna
289 – Woods – Margaret – 12 – Daughter – Anna
290 – Woods – William – 10 – Son – Anna
291 – Woods – Eliza – 9 – Daughter – Anna
292 – Woods – Jane – 6 – Daughter – Anna
293 – Woods – Robert – 3 – Son – Anna
294 – Woods – Anne – 1 – Daughter – Anna

295 – Waldock – William – 33 – Labourer – Sutton
296 – Waldock – Maria – 32 – Wife – Sutton
297 – Waldock – Thomas – 13 – Son – Sutton
298 – Waldock – George – 11 – Son – Sutton
299 – Waldock – William – 9 – Son – Sutton
300 – Waldock – Jane – 8 – Daughter – Sutton
301 – Waldock – John – 4 – Son – Sutton
302 – Waldock – Samuel – 2 – Son – Sutton
303 – Waldock – Maria – 7 weeks – Daughter – Sutton

304 – Ward – Charles – 24 – Labourer – Derrybourne
305 – Ward – Marys – 23 – Wife – Derrybourne
306 – Watts – George – 27 – Labourer – Starkbine
307 – Watts – Elizabeth – 25 – Wife – Starkbine
308 – Watts – Richard – infant – Son – Starkbine

309 – White – Thomas – 25 – Labourer – Tringford
310 – White – Anne – 23 – Wife – Tringford
311 – Figg – Hanna – 3 – Step – daughter – Tringford

312 – White – John – 20 – Labourer – Emetrim
313 – White – Eliza Jane – 28 – Wife – Emetrim

UNMARRIED FEMALES LIST

1 – Arnold – Harriet – 23 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
2 – Arnold – Anne – 21 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
3 – Appleby – Rachael – 28 – Farm Servant – Armagh
4 – Boots – M. Anne – 17 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
5 – Campbell – Margaret – 27 – Farm Servant – Muckamore
6 – Chuck – Chuck – 15 – Farm Servant – Bassingbourne – Sister of Robert Chuck recorded in the Families List
7 – Duffy – Mary – 18 – Farm Servant – Colleridge, Maynooth
8 – Duffy – Bridget – 22 – Farm Servant – Colleridge, Maynooth
9 – Fitzpatrick – Mary – 18 – Farm Servant – Kilmore
10 – Gilmore – Elizabeth – 15 – Farm Servant – Emetrim
11 – Gray – Mary – 22 – Farm Servant – Ardee
12 – Houghton – Anne – 20 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
13 – Houghton – Ellen – 25 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
14 – Hopkins – Jane – 21 – Farm Servant – Charlestown
15 – Irvin – Anne – 27 – Farm Servant – Loughall
16 – Kingerton – Isabella – 20 – Farm Servant – Skull
17 – King – Mary – 20 – Farm Servant – Kinmore
18 – Loveridge – Mary Anne – 27 – Farm Servant – Stokelyre
19 – Maguire – Bridget – 14 – Farm Servant – Kilerkin
20 – M’Donald – Anne – 20 – Farm Servant – Derryborne
21 – M’Caffrey – Mary – 23 – Farm Servant – Carraing
22 – M’Caffrey – Susan – 20 – Farm Servant – Carraing
23 – M’Quillan – Mary – 24 – Farm Servant – Anna
24 – Sherridan – Elizabeth – 23 – Farm Servant – Carrygallon
25 – Smith – Mary – 17 – Farm Servant – Muden
26 – Smith – Catherine – 25 – Farm Servant – Muden
27 – Smith – Rose – 26 – Farm Servant – Ematrin
28 – Sullivan – Catherine – 23 – Farm Servant – Kilgarven
29 – Walton – Emily – 18 – Farm Servant – Rousham
30 – Wood – Ellen – 16 – Farm Servant – Drumballoney
31 – Wood – Mary – 19 – Farm Servant – Ematrin
32 – Whalan – Margaret – 24 – Farm Servant – Drumkelly
33 – Tagart – Mary – 15 – Farm Servant – Killway

UNMARRIED MALES LIST

1 – Bushly – Samuel – 22 – Labourer – Bolnhurst
2 – Brothers – Patrick – 18 – Labourer – Aughnamullen
3 – Black – Joshua – 19 – Labourer – Kildren
4 – Crawford – John – 23 – Carpenter – Muckanmore
5 – Connell – William – 27 – Labourer – Cananoren
6 – Collins – Thomas – 22 – Labourer – Omagh
7 – Gilmore – John – 20 – Labourer – Emetrin
8 – Gray – Thomas – 24 – Labourer – Ardee
9 – Green – William – 25 – Labourer – Kirkometrin (Isle of Man)
10 – Hopkins – Thomas – 24 – Labourer – Charlestown
11 – Jones – Patrick – 22 – Carpenter – Calmkiss
12 – Rully – Patrick – 19 – Labourer – Anna
13 – Loveridge – John – 21 – Labourer – Stokelyre
14 – Millan – John – 22 – Labourer – Arboury (Isle of Man)
15 – M’Donald – Bernard – 20 – Labourer – Currin
16 – M’Donald – William – 18 – Labourer – Derryborne
17 – M’Quinnan – – 27 – Labourer – Kildrin
18 – M’Quire – T. – 17 – Labourer – Kullenhone
19 – Whalan – Thomas – 27 – Labourer – Drunkelly
20 – Sullivan – Denis – 25 – Labourer – Bunnand
21 – Smith – Jonah – 20 – Labourer – Gilden Murden – Nephew of Elizabeth Pettingell (nee Butler) – Brother of Thomas Smith recorded in the Families List
22 – Quin – Miles – 19 – Labourer – Derryboorne
23 – Oliver – James – 20 – Labourer – Stonesfield

RECAPITULATION

62 Families (as per certificates of character of emigrants washed on shore) – 313 souls
Unmarried females – 33 souls
Unmarried males – 23 souls
Total – 69
Deduct – Solomon Brown, the only emigrant saved

Total Number of Emigrants lost – 368

NOMINAL LIST OF OFFICERS AND CREW SAVED

Thomas Guthery – Chief Mate
William Jones – Able Seaman
Francis Millen – Able Seaman
John Roberts – Able Seaman
John Simpson – Ordinary Seaman
John Robertson – Ordinary Seaman
Peter Johnson – Ordinary Seaman
William Blackstock – Apprentice

NOMINAL LIST of the OFFICERS and CREW of the Ship “Cataraque” who were drowned

C. W. Finaly – Captain
(not recorded) Justice – 2d Mate
Charles Carpenter – Surgeon Superintendent
Edward Carpenter – Assistant Surgeon
Andrew (not recorded) – Boatswain
Donald McClelland – Carpenter
(not recorded) Dawson – Steward
J. B. Taulton – Purser
Jno. Brown – Purser’s Assistant
Andrew Lee – Cook
John Tucker – Emigrant’s Cook
Martin Standing – Able Seaman
John Cloadsley – Able Seaman
W. McChish – Able Seaman
Henry Anderson – Able Seaman
George Dawson – Able Seaman
William Welsh – Able Seaman
John Gayford – Able Seaman
John May – Able Seaman
John Gregg – Able Seaman
John Finlay – Able Seaman
Edward Alleny – Able Seaman
Joseph Boulton – Able Seaman
William Jones – Ordinary
Robert Harvey – Drowned at sea 4th July
Peter Carle – Apprentice
William Witton – Apprentice
Henry Finch – Apprentice
(not recorded) Dawson – Apprentice
Thomas Hopwood – Apprentice
William Dicks – Apprentice

This is an excerpt from the original documentation titled: Copies of Reports and Correspondence respecting the Loss of the Emigrant Ship “Cataraque,” in Bass’s Straits digitised by Google Books (Courtesy Harvard College Library).  The complete set of reports, etc., totals 21 pages.

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