1867 The Year of the Floods in New South Wales

The year was 1867, the year that the greatest floods of record hit New South Wales. From April reports started to filter in of devastating floods throughout the state. The worst were to occur in June 1867 in the Hunter (Maitland and Newcastle), the Hawkesbury (Penrith, Windsor, Richmond, North Richmond, St Marys, Riverstone, Pitt Town, Cattai, and Sackville), the Blue Mountains (Bathurst), and in the Mudgee Region (Burrandong), which accompanied great loss of property and life. Following are some of the reports given at the time, including first-hand accounts of their bravery and loss.

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Swan River 1832

A letter penned by William Thomas Stocker of Van Dieman’s Land, giving an account of Swan River, Port Augusta, and King George’s Sound in Western Australia.

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Bendigo Government Camp 1853

Map of the Bendigo Government Camp in 1853 – Includes a list of 45 Government Officers who were stationed on Bendigo Government Camps in 1850s

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Letter from The Hunter’s River – 1827

The second of two letters published in ‘The Australian’ in 1827, in response to the impressions given by a previous writer of five letters, published in the same newspaper, entitled “A Trip to the Hunter’s River”.

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A Trip on the Hawkesbury – 1880

Published in early 1880 in the Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser the author takes the reader on a descriptive trip down the Hawkesbury river of New South Wales.

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Rambles Through Sydney – Part I – The Rocks – 1864

Looking east across ship at Campbell’s Wharf to Government House in centre distance

Part one of an eight part series published in the Sydney Morning Herald between 12 May 1864 and 15 July 1864. In this series the authors take the readers on a journey through the streets of Sydney “beyond the line of handsomely built houses, and off the well kept streets, to show them the nooks and crannies into which they themselves have never penetrated, to make them acquainted with the abodes of poverty, of misfortune, or of crime.”

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